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Attorneys - Firearm Defense


Molly B.

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Belleville

Justin Kuehn

23 South First

Belleville, IL 62220

Phone:618-277-7260

http://www.kuehnlawfirm.com/justin-kuehn

email: JustinKuehn@KuehnLawFirm.com

 

Bloomington, IL
Todd A. Roseberry
Schwulst & Roseberry, P.C.
407 W. Front Street, Suite No.2
Bloomington, IL 61701
office phone (309) 829-3636
office e-mail: advok8@frontier.com

www.jschwulst.com

 

Johnson Law Group (represented James Love)
115 W Front St.
Bloomington, IL 61701
Locations on Bloomington, Peoria, Decatur, Springfield
 

 

Bradley, IL

Mike Donahue

183 E. North Street

Bradley,IL 60915

(708)873-1340

Cell (708)691-0457

email- donahueharleylaw@yahoo.com

 

 

Canton, IL

Ryan L. Powers
Froehling, Weber & Schell, LLP
167 West Elm Street
Canton, Illinois 61520
(309) 647-6317
(309) 647-6350 (fax)

Ryan has been successful in several CCL court appeals

 

Chicago, IL
 
Lipe Lyons Murphy
Edward J. Murphy
Tel: 312.448.6234
Fax: 312.726.2273
230 West Monroe Street, Suite 2260
Chicago, IL 60606-4703
Life Member of NRA, ISRA, member of SAF
 

Peter G. Baroni
Leinenweber Baroni & Daffada
ph: 866.786.3705
fax: 800.896.2193
www.ilesq.com
peter@ilesq.com
Chicago - Wheaton - Springfield - Wilmette

 
Edward Johnson
51 E. Burlington St.
Riverside, IL 60546
708-606-4386
News article about Mr. Johnson's work in the city of Chicago - http://interactive.wbez.org/everyotherhour/legal-guns/
 
Vincent T. Borst
180 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 3300
Chicago, Illinois 60601
T 312.782.9000 | F 312.782.6690
and
2222 Chestnut Avenue, Suite 101
Glenview, Illinois 60026
T 847.729.7300 | F 847.729.7390
 
Williams & Nickl, LLC
200 West Adams, Suite 2475
Chicago, IL 60606
312-335-9470
www.williamsnickl.com/
fred@williamsnickl.com
 
J. D. Obenberger, Attorney at Law
115 South LaSalle Street, Suite 2600
Chicago, IL 60603
312.558.6420

 

Beau Winston

312-206-0055

beauwinston@gmail.com

 

 

Dupage, Cook, and Kane
William Glisson
Bloomingdale, IL 60108
Office: 630-677-7100

 

Glenn M. Sowa, LLC

524 W. State Street, Unit 2

Geneva, IL 60134

630-232-1780

https://www.dui-crim...weapons-charges
Takes cases in Cook County, Will County, DeKalb County, DuPage County, Kane County, Kendall County and McHenry County.

 

Evanston

Alexander Blum

900 Chicago Ave, Ste 104

Evanston, Il 60202

773-999-BLUM

AlexanderBlum.com

Alexanderbblum@gmail.com

 

Glen Ellyn

David Sigale (Attorney for Second Amendment Foundation)

739 Roosevelt Rd.
Suite 304
Glen Ellyn, IL 600137

(630) 452-4547

 

Joliet, IL

Jeff Tomczak
116 N. Chicago St.. Suite 500
Joliet, Illinois 60432
Phone - 815-723-4400
Fax - 815-723-4422

 

Kankakee, IL

Michael R. Donahue
Law Office of Michael R. Donahue
200 E. Court Street #700
Kankakee, IL 60901
(708) 873-1340

(708) 691-0457
www.concealcarrylawyers.com

Kankakee, Will, Iroquois, Livingston and Southern Cook County

 

Lincolnwood, IL

Irving Federman & Leah Federman

Attorneys

7101 N. Cicero Ave.

Suite 200

Lincolnwood, IL 60712

(312) 829-8898

(847) 910-1202

Fax: 847-674-2569

Email: irvingfederman@gmail.com

 

 

Marion, IL

David Lawler of the Adam B. Lawler firm

3600 W. Main

Marion, IL

618-993-2222

dlawler@adamblawler.com

 

Peoria Heights, IL
Jim Kelly Law
4801 N. Prospect Road
Peoria Heights, IL 61616
309-679-0900

 

Quad-Cities

Eric D Puryear
Puryear Law P.C.
3719 Bridge Ave. #6
Davenport, IA 52807
Illinois Phone 309-948-6699
Iowa Phone 563-265-6961
Toll Free 888-919-3719
email eric@puryearlaw.com

 

Rockford, IL

Jerry Lund

Vella and Lund

401 W State St #300, Rockford, IL

61101

815-965-7979

http://www.vellalundlaw.com/

 

Jason B. Tempin

Associate Attorney - Winnebago County, Boone County, Ogle County, Stephenson County

The Law Office of Jonathan James, LLC.

416 E. State St.

Rockford, IL. 61104

Phone: 779-500-0167

Fax: 815-331-3876

jason@northernillinoislaw.com
 

Richard Butera

728 N Main St Rockford, IL 61103

buteralawoffices@gmail.com

815/962-9996

 

 

Roselle, IL

 

Charles Wm. Dobra, Ltd.

675 E. Irving Park Road Suite 100

Roselle, Illinois 60172

Phone: 630-893-2494

Email: cwdobra@dobralaw.comcastbiz.net

Website: http://www.dobralawfirm.com

 

Scott C Haugh, JD
Haugh Law Group-APLC
675 E. Irving Park Road
Suite 203
Roselle, IL 60172
(630) 908-2752 and 2745
(630) 894-9927 (f)

 

 

Schaumberg, IL

Glasgow & Olsson
1834 Walden Office Square, Suite 575
Schaumburg, IL 60173
Telephone: 847-577-8700

 

Skokie, IL

David P. Mierswa
Law Offices of David P. Mierswa & Assoc PC
5225 Old Orchard Road, Suite 5
Skokie, IL 60077
Tel: 847-566-6294 Fax: 847-566-6304
lawyerllll@aol.com
http://www.uritraining.com/AboutUs.html

South Elgin, IL

Jennifer L. Stallings, Esq.

2000 McDonald Road, Suite 200

South Elgin, IL 60177

Phone: (847) 695-2400

Fax: (847) 695-2401

E-Mail: jstallings@attorneys-illinois.com

Website: www.attorneys-illinois.com

 

Waukegan, IL

Mark Shaw in Lake County:

Shaw Law Ltd.
33 North County Street, Suite 300
Waukegan, Illinois 60085
Phone: 847-244-4696
Fax: 847-244-4673

 

Wood River

Thomas Maag:

Wendler Law PC

22 West Lorena Ave.

Wood River, IL 62095

Phone: +1 618 216 5291

Fax: +1 618 551 0421

tmaag@maaglaw.com

 

Will -- Dan Rippy/ Jeff Tomzack

Joel W. Ostrander 708-383-2112 Ph 708-383-2234 Fax

Robert Kerr, LLC 312-265-3257 or 888-332-6890

Jeffery Mandell 312-782-3589

Hal M. Garfinkel 312-629-0669

Steven R. Hunter 312-466-9466

Mitchell S. Sexner & Assoc. LLC 800-996-4824

Acosta Batovski & Schmiege 312-218-8050

Norris & Callahan 847-517-4136 or 877-335-6697

Kendal -- Boyd Ingamunson, Yorkville

 

 

http://www.isra.org/..._referral.shtml

http://www.theshoote...e10/page10.html

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Too bad we didn't sicky an existing thread.
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Too bad we didn't sicky an existing thread.

 

Did I not get everything transferred over to this one? Please let me know if I missed something.

 

There were a lot of posts for a reader to have to plow through in the other one and then there was the whole Peterson thing.

Only thing missing is my ego
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Today my wife and I met with Boyd Ingemunson in Yorkville. They were in the process of moving into their new office.

 

We had a few things to talk to him about, one of which was firearm and self defense situations.

 

He seems to be the guy to go to in the area, and the office has been around a long time. He was very polite and treated us well. We will definitely keep him in our phones and on call for anything in the future. He does work outside firearms, too, so we will call him for other needs.

 

The main point of my post here is that the most prominent names you see here on the board (Todd, Molly, etc) do a lot of work to help us all. I would recommend anyone in the Yorkville area who needs an attorney to see Boyd, and if not him then someone else on the list.

 

Thank you, Todd, Molly and everyone else who works hard for the cause!

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I'm have to check my notes, but I believe I was referred to Mierswa (sp?) by the NRA-ILA when shtf in Highland Park. I attempted to contact him for a consult and he never returned my call. I don't know if he would be considered a reliable source in time of need, especially if I'm seeing stuff where Chicago PD will shoot law abiding citizens with firearms.

 

http://clashdaily.com/2013/09/chicago-cops-superintendent-says-cops-will-shoot-gun-carrying-citizens-training/

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Today my wife and I met with Boyd Ingemunson in Yorkville. They were in the process of moving into their new office.

 

We had a few things to talk to him about, one of which was firearm and self defense situations.

 

He seems to be the guy to go to in the area, and the office has been around a long time. He was very polite and treated us well. We will definitely keep him in our phones and on call for anything in the future. He does work outside firearms, too, so we will call him for other needs.

 

The main point of my post here is that the most prominent names you see here on the board (Todd, Molly, etc) do a lot of work to help us all. I would recommend anyone in the Yorkville area who needs an attorney to see Boyd, and if not him then someone else on the list.

 

Thank you, Todd, Molly and everyone else who works hard for the cause!

 

Boyd's great, and well connected. Used him extensively for traffic stuff.

 

Sent from my Galaxy S4 using Tapatalk

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Karlin hates guns from the comments I've seen him make. He's also Nicholas Sheley's attorney (the wackjob who killed his way down the Mississippi River valley because he needed crack). He also happens to be my Alderman (worthless).

 

Sent from my SCH-R530U using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I had a very good meeting with Mark Shaw in Waukegan - I was impressed. I ran some scenarios by him where I see some gaping holes in the law, and the high likelihood of being sued if a trained individual goes off the reservation - among other things. He agreed that there could be issues, but there is NO CASE LAW for most CC issues in Illinois. Courts would look to other states and take their case law into consideration. Although Mark is very knowledgeable, I seemed more knowledgeable about what other states' laws call for having been a former and active CC licensee in North Carolina.

 

One gaping hole, especially for those who have taken PPITH or are an instructor - is when to disengage. In many other states the shooting regimen is 3, 5, and 7 yards and the B27 target is actually scored to meet a minimum score. I understand this follows established FBI procedures, and many other states follow that regimen. Here in IL, we have to determine that an individual can shoot at 5, 7, and 10 yards. In North Carolina, if you end up shooting someone at 10 yards, you'll end up going to jail for at least manslaughter - because you may have had an opportunity to disengage. You can argue about it, but this is actually taught in the NC classes, and there used to be "shoot/don't shoot" videos that were produced by the NCHP for the purpose of establishing when to disengage. You probably won't find a jury to convict the shooter, but imagine the expenses and hassle. According to our lack of established laws in IL, there is no problem in shooting at 10 yards. Without stating it, we're telling students to blast away out to 30 feet, and it's OK if 30% of your rounds are stray. I'd challenge Joe Blow off the street to qualify with his 2" snubbie revolver. This issue makes me a bit nervous, and I can imagine those who can honestly call themselves firearms attorneys will be very busy once permits hit the street.

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Darn,are there no good attorneys (I know,oxymoron) in the southern half of the state?

 

David Lawler of the Adam B. Lawler firm in Marion will do self defense cases. He has a non-resident Utah LTC BTW. The office address is 3600 W. Main in Marion. 618-993-2222 dlawler@adamblawler.com He gave me a few of his cards to give out. He said he checks his emails and answering machine on weekends should anyone need him.

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I had a very good meeting with Mark Shaw in Waukegan - I was impressed. I ran some scenarios by him where I see some gaping holes in the law, and the high likelihood of being sued if a trained individual goes off the reservation - among other things. He agreed that there could be issues, but there is NO CASE LAW for most CC issues in Illinois. Courts would look to other states and take their case law into consideration. Although Mark is very knowledgeable, I seemed more knowledgeable about what other states' laws call for having been a former and active CC licensee in North Carolina.

 

One gaping hole, especially for those who have taken PPITH or are an instructor - is when to disengage. In many other states the shooting regimen is 3, 5, and 7 yards and the B27 target is actually scored to meet a minimum score. I understand this follows established FBI procedures, and many other states follow that regimen. Here in IL, we have to determine that an individual can shoot at 5, 7, and 10 yards. In North Carolina, if you end up shooting someone at 10 yards, you'll end up going to jail for at least manslaughter - because you may have had an opportunity to disengage. You can argue about it, but this is actually taught in the NC classes, and there used to be "shoot/don't shoot" videos that were produced by the NCHP for the purpose of establishing when to disengage. You probably won't find a jury to convict the shooter, but imagine the expenses and hassle. According to our lack of established laws in IL, there is no problem in shooting at 10 yards. Without stating it, we're telling students to blast away out to 30 feet, and it's OK if 30% of your rounds are stray. I'd challenge Joe Blow off the street to qualify with his 2" snubbie revolver. This issue makes me a bit nervous, and I can imagine those who can honestly call themselves firearms attorneys will be very busy once permits hit the street.

I have a Virginia nonresident ccw because I lived in Chesapeake. My house is 20 minutes max from the North Carolina state line, so I fully understand what you are saying. North Carolina has some interesting ccw laws, ie, you cannot stick a firearm in the glove box and call it concealed. NC's argument is a ccp issued to a person and not a vehicle, however, I find this all irrelevant as to how it applies to Illinois. The attorney, imo, is correct about Illinois lack of case law and the courts looking at other states for precedent. They will not be so eager to look at North Carolina though. The courts typically look for case law in neighboring states first. That means we better hope IN, KY, MO, IA, MN, WI, etc have precedents that go in our favor.
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I had a very good meeting with Mark Shaw in Waukegan - I was impressed. I ran some scenarios by him where I see some gaping holes in the law, and the high likelihood of being sued if a trained individual goes off the reservation - among other things. He agreed that there could be issues, but there is NO CASE LAW for most CC issues in Illinois. Courts would look to other states and take their case law into consideration. Although Mark is very knowledgeable, I seemed more knowledgeable about what other states' laws call for having been a former and active CC licensee in North Carolina.

 

One gaping hole, especially for those who have taken PPITH or are an instructor - is when to disengage. In many other states the shooting regimen is 3, 5, and 7 yards and the B27 target is actually scored to meet a minimum score. I understand this follows established FBI procedures, and many other states follow that regimen. Here in IL, we have to determine that an individual can shoot at 5, 7, and 10 yards. In North Carolina, if you end up shooting someone at 10 yards, you'll end up going to jail for at least manslaughter - because you may have had an opportunity to disengage. You can argue about it, but this is actually taught in the NC classes, and there used to be "shoot/don't shoot" videos that were produced by the NCHP for the purpose of establishing when to disengage. You probably won't find a jury to convict the shooter, but imagine the expenses and hassle. According to our lack of established laws in IL, there is no problem in shooting at 10 yards. Without stating it, we're telling students to blast away out to 30 feet, and it's OK if 30% of your rounds are stray. I'd challenge Joe Blow off the street to qualify with his 2" snubbie revolver. This issue makes me a bit nervous, and I can imagine those who can honestly call themselves firearms attorneys will be very busy once permits hit the street.

I have a Virginia nonresident ccw because I lived in Chesapeake. My house is 20 minutes max from the North Carolina state line, so I fully understand what you are saying. North Carolina has some interesting ccw laws, ie, you cannot stick a firearm in the glove box and call it concealed. NC's argument is a ccp issued to a person and not a vehicle, however, I find this all irrelevant as to how it applies to Illinois. The attorney, imo, is correct about Illinois lack of case law and the courts looking at other states for precedent. They will not be so eager to look at North Carolina though. The courts typically look for case law in neighboring states first. That means we better hope IN, KY, MO, IA, MN, WI, etc have precedents that go in our favor.

 

I tell my students, "There are 3 types of laws. Legislative intent, Letter of the law and Case law. Case law is probably the most important and is completely lacking in IL because nobody has been charged with CCL violations YET. Don't be the test cases unless you have the deep pockets to challenge the intent and letter of the law. Even a lawyer giving his or her interpretation of the law is still guessing somewhat, until we get some case law on the books. Err on the side of caution until case law clearly defines a given scenario."

Edited by cgs
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I had a very good meeting with Mark Shaw in Waukegan - I was impressed. I ran some scenarios by him where I see some gaping holes in the law, and the high likelihood of being sued if a trained individual goes off the reservation - among other things. He agreed that there could be issues, but there is NO CASE LAW for most CC issues in Illinois. Courts would look to other states and take their case law into consideration. Although Mark is very knowledgeable, I seemed more knowledgeable about what other states' laws call for having been a former and active CC licensee in North Carolina.

 

One gaping hole, especially for those who have taken PPITH or are an instructor - is when to disengage. In many other states the shooting regimen is 3, 5, and 7 yards and the B27 target is actually scored to meet a minimum score. I understand this follows established FBI procedures, and many other states follow that regimen. Here in IL, we have to determine that an individual can shoot at 5, 7, and 10 yards. In North Carolina, if you end up shooting someone at 10 yards, you'll end up going to jail for at least manslaughter - because you may have had an opportunity to disengage. You can argue about it, but this is actually taught in the NC classes, and there used to be "shoot/don't shoot" videos that were produced by the NCHP for the purpose of establishing when to disengage. You probably won't find a jury to convict the shooter, but imagine the expenses and hassle. According to our lack of established laws in IL, there is no problem in shooting at 10 yards. Without stating it, we're telling students to blast away out to 30 feet, and it's OK if 30% of your rounds are stray. I'd challenge Joe Blow off the street to qualify with his 2" snubbie revolver. This issue makes me a bit nervous, and I can imagine those who can honestly call themselves firearms attorneys will be very busy once permits hit the street.

I have a Virginia nonresident ccw because I lived in Chesapeake. My house is 20 minutes max from the North Carolina state line, so I fully understand what you are saying. North Carolina has some interesting ccw laws, ie, you cannot stick a firearm in the glove box and call it concealed. NC's argument is a ccp issued to a person and not a vehicle, however, I find this all irrelevant as to how it applies to Illinois. The attorney, imo, is correct about Illinois lack of case law and the courts looking at other states for precedent. They will not be so eager to look at North Carolina though. The courts typically look for case law in neighboring states first. That means we better hope IN, KY, MO, IA, MN, WI, etc have precedents that go in our favor.

 

I tell my students, "There are 3 types of laws. Legislative intent, Letter of the law and Case law. Case law is probably the most important and is completely lacking in IL because nobody has been charged with CCL violations YET. Don't be the test cases unless you have the deep pockets to challenge the intent and letter of the law. Even a lawyer giving his or her interpretation of the law is still guessing somewhat, until we get some case law on the books. Err on the side of caution until case law clearly defines a given scenario."

This is exactly why I have a $1/2 million legal insurance policy for using my firearms. I don't want to be the test case, but some things are not avoidable. Just like my firearms, I have it so that I don't need it.
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I am not so sure I would be looking at someone who claims firearms law as their expertise. I think someone who is a criminal defense attorney might be the ticket. Preferably someone with some clue about firearms, but really the issue is being adequately defended. I suspect that requires the best criminal defense attorney you can afford as opposed to someone who merely claims expertise in firearms law.
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Has anyone seen any reviews of the various insurance policies that are currently out there that provide defense attorneys or their cost in the event you needed to use your firearm for self defense? I have seen several offerings and the cost is fairly reasonable, but a comparison/review would be great.
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  • 2 weeks later...

Karlin hates guns from the comments I've seen him make. He's also Nicholas Sheley's attorney (the wackjob who killed his way down the Mississippi River valley because he needed crack). He also happens to be my Alderman (worthless).

 

Sent from my SCH-R530U using Tapatalk 2

I don't care if he hates guns and is a worthless alderman as long as he is a good defence attorney.
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