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If one of last month's Northern Illinois University shooting victims had been able to carry a concealed weapon, she could have stopped the assailant, a gun-rights advocate said Tuesday.

 

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Valinda Rowe, a firearms instructor from Enfield, rallied with hundreds of others in support of concealed-carry legislation during Illinois Gun Owners Lobby Day at the state Capitol.

 

The victim Rowe referred to, Julianna Gehant, a 32-year-old veteran from Mendota, was one of five students killed when gunman Steven Kasmierczak opened fire in Cole Hall at NIU on Valentine's Day.

 

"From the reports I read, she warned everyone, 'Get down, get low, get out of here,' and she was shot and killed," Rowe said.

 

Rowe said because Gehant had military and firearms training, the tragedy might have been lessened or prevented if she was able to shoot a gun instead of just being able to yell.

 

"If she had pulled out a firearm and stopped that man, or at least caused him to duck and run, lives could have been saved until help got there," she said.

 

Rowe and others lobbied in favor of House Bill 4544 proposed by Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Peoria. The bill's fate remained uncertain Tuesday, but Schock said he's still working to attract support.

 

HB 4544, also known as the Family and Personal Protection Act, would require individuals to complete a training course in handgun use, safety and marksmanship before they could receive a permit to carry a concealed firearm in the state. The bill also requires an applicant to be at least 21 years old. Anyone convicted of a felony or with a history of mental illness, addiction or habitual alcohol use would be prohibited from obtaining a permit.

 

The legislation is awaiting consideration in the House Agriculture and Conservation Committee.

 

During Tuesday's rally, some gun-rights advocates also spoke out against gun-control proposals that would ban assault weapons, implement ammunition encoding and limit gun purchases to one per month.

 

Richard Pearson, executive director of the Illinois State Rifle Association, believes anti-gun legislation is not the solution in preventing tragedies like the NIU shooting.

 

"Many (gun control) proposals simply smother the individual gun owner in red tape," he said.

 

Joel Brunsvold, a former state representative and lobbyist for the National Shooting Sports Foundation, said he thinks a proposed ban on assault weapons could adversely affect hunters and sports shooters trying to purchase certain types of equipment.

 

Rep. Edward Acevedo, D-Chicago, sponsor of House Bill 4357, which calls for a ban on assault weapons, said a clause in the bill would exempt some shooting competitions. "How many shots are you going to need to kill a deer or pheasant? If you can't shoot your target in a matter of three or four rounds, put the gun down," he said. "A .50-caliber weapon will completely disintegrate the target."

 

Gun-rights advocates said they believe that Illinois needs to follow the lead of the other 48 states that already have some kind of concealed-carry law.

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Rep. Edward Acevedo, D-Chicago, sponsor of House Bill 4357, which calls for a ban on assault weapons, said a clause in the bill would exempt some shooting competitions. "How many shots are you going to need to kill a deer or pheasant? If you can't shoot your target in a matter of three or four rounds, put the gun down," he said. "A .50-caliber weapon will completely disintegrate the target."

 

He's still talking about hunting. He doesn't understand what a free society is supposed to be. He thinks you don't need an AR or high capacity magazine. Well people don't need Corvettes either. People want them and in a so called free society we can have them.

 

I'd like to see him carry a .50 BMG down a fence row and then smoothly/quickly mount and shoot it off-hand.

 

"How many shots are you going to need to kill a deer or pheasant? If you can't shoot your target in a matter of three or four rounds, put the gun down," he said.

 

To answer this question for him, he should go ask the Chicago PD SWAT members who hunt at my friend's club how many shots they need. These guys hunt with their tactical shotguns. It's legal on a hunting preserve to have an un-plugged and extended magazine tube on the shotgun. Now they don't ever need all the shots available to them, but they hunt with those guns because they can. So could we in the same situation.

 

He keeps talking about hunting, but knows nothing about it. In most hunting situations on wild game, you're limited to a maximum of 3 rounds in a shotgun regardless of how many rounds it can hold and the magazine tube must be plugged!

 

His argument is crap and it's too bad his sheeple constituents don't know it.

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I'd like to see him carry a .50 BMG down a fence row and then smoothly/quickly mount and shoot it off-hand.

 

I'd like to see him say something that isn't idiotic and manipulative for once, and sadly you have just as good a chance of getting your wish as I do mine.

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From the JG-TC:

 

http://www.jg-tc.com/articles/2008/03/12/a...l/d8vbpm0o3.txt

 

A nice little slam from the ISP on why they oppose CCW.

 

Illinois State Police spokesman Scott Compton said his department has opposed concealed-carry proposals in the past because training levels required for a private citizen to use a weapon wouldn't near the training officers get.

 

So would he support it if the people getting them had military or police training? Doubt it.

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I checked Chicago Tribune and Sun-Times this morning. Not too surprisingly, nothing regarding IGOLD.

 

But the Trib has a video (regarding more CPD patroling Chicago schools) of Daley saying "we can tell people you cannot smoke....but where is the outrage by all the people about no guns in the hands of the people of America."

 

Sorry, I don't have a direct link to the video, but it's on the home page of the Trib.

 

Update - I found a link to the video:

 

http://www.chicagotribune.com/video/?clipI...;clipFormat=flv

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I just went through the entire Chicago tribune and all the had was an anti--gun editorial calling for more useless anti-gun laws.

 

I know they knew about IGOLD becasue I sent several editors and reportes info last week.

 

I knew they would ignore something that doesn't fit theri antigun agenda.

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Jerry Agar on WLS 890 AM just talked abut how the major Chicago papers ignored it while covering any Jesse Jackson march.

 

He said that is what he predicted Monday when he had Valinda on.

 

It's good to have a 2A advocate on a major station in Northern Illinois.

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Article in the Southern this morning.

 

http://www.thesouthern.com/articles/2008/0...ge/23710529.txt

 

 

Gun laws might not see much change this year

by Mike Riopell, the southern springfield bureau

Tuesday, March 11, 2008 11:09 PM CDT

SPRINGFIELD - The issue draws the ire of thousands on either side, but lawmakers acknowledge that the political realities of Springfield mean changes in state gun laws could be tough to make happen this year.

 

Tuesday brought thousands of activists to the Illinois State Capitol asking lawmakers to resist putting more restrictions on gun ownership. They also called for laws that would allow private citizens to carry concealed weapons.

 

Dustin Meier of Decatur said he hoped the marching mass of activists got lawmakers' attention.

 

"It's kind of a visual aid," he said.

 

State Sen. Bill Brady, R-Bloomington, was among lawmakers addressing a crowd on the Capitol steps that was organized by the Illinois State Rifle Association.

 

Brady said the differing opinions among lawmakers could leave them locked in a stalemate.

 

"It's not going to be an easy year," he said.

 

Many lawmakers who represent areas dealing with gun violence in Chicago or other urban areas have tended in the past to propose gun control measures and oppose the idea of concealed carry.

 

Legislation pending in the General Assembly includes proposals for more licensing requirements and a ban on assault weapons.

 

At direct odds with those gun control proposals are lawmakers who represent farmers and hunters who use guns regularly.

 

State Rep. John Bradley, D-Marion, is among a handful of lawmakers pushing to give Illinoisans concealed carry rights. Another backer of concealed weapons, state Rep. Aaron Schock, a Peoria Republican and candidate for Congress, was not on the House floor Tuesday.

 

"It's an ongoing war," Bradley said.

 

The "war" is complicated by Gov. Rod Blagojevich's veto power. The Chicago Democrat favors gun control, and overriding him takes a two-thirds majority of lawmakers.

 

There is little doubt about the governor's position on concealed carry laws.

 

"As the governor has said before ? allowing more people to carry concealed weapons would be the wrong way to go in Illinois," said Blagojevich spokeswoman Abby Ottenhoff.

 

"We need to balance the right of sportsmen and hunters to legally own guns with the need to help law enforcement and protect the public from gun violence," Ottenhoff added.

 

Illinois State Police spokesman Scott Compton said his department has opposed concealed-carry proposals in the past because training levels required for a private citizen to use a weapon wouldn't near the training officers get.

 

Compton said officers are trained on both how to use a gun, and when it's appropriate to do so.

 

"It's something we practice on a continuous basis," he said.

 

A group of mostly female concealed carry supporters delivered a memo to Blagojevich's office asking him to support it. But the governor has been a critic of concealed carry in the past.

 

mike.riopell@lee.net / (217) 789-0865@lee.net / (217) 789-0865

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WOW!! The Daily Herald, a Chicago paper, gets it RIGHT!!

 

Among the many gun owners fighting Tuesday against proposals such as ammunition coding and sporting-rifle bans, more than 50 women voiced support for the self-defense needs Schock's legislation would allow.

 

Amber Krosel wrote the story, but I think Molly B. had something to do with this accurate reporting.

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From the JG-TC:

 

http://www.jg-tc.com/articles/2008/03/12/a...l/d8vbpm0o3.txt

 

A nice little slam from the ISP on why they oppose CCW.

 

Illinois State Police spokesman Scott Compton said his department has opposed concealed-carry proposals in the past because training levels required for a private citizen to use a weapon wouldn't near the training officers get.

 

So would he support it if the people getting them had military or police training? Doubt it.

One question to the ISP, How much training does the criminal have? In my honest opinion, any one that has fired and trained in the Military should be allowed to carry a concealed weapon. If he has the training to defend this country, then he has the training to defend himself.

 

 

Mac

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Article in the Southern this morning.

 

http://www.thesouthern.com/articles/2008/0...ge/23710529.txt

 

 

Gun laws might not see much change this year

by Mike Riopell, the southern springfield bureau

Tuesday, March 11, 2008 11:09 PM CDT

SPRINGFIELD - The issue draws the ire of thousands on either side, but lawmakers acknowledge that the political realities of Springfield mean changes in state gun laws could be tough to make happen this year.

 

Tuesday brought thousands of activists to the Illinois State Capitol asking lawmakers to resist putting more restrictions on gun ownership. They also called for laws that would allow private citizens to carry concealed weapons.

 

Dustin Meier of Decatur said he hoped the marching mass of activists got lawmakers' attention.

 

"It's kind of a visual aid," he said.

 

State Sen. Bill Brady, R-Bloomington, was among lawmakers addressing a crowd on the Capitol steps that was organized by the Illinois State Rifle Association.

 

Brady said the differing opinions among lawmakers could leave them locked in a stalemate.

 

"It's not going to be an easy year," he said.

 

Many lawmakers who represent areas dealing with gun violence in Chicago or other urban areas have tended in the past to propose gun control measures and oppose the idea of concealed carry.

 

Legislation pending in the General Assembly includes proposals for more licensing requirements and a ban on assault weapons.

 

At direct odds with those gun control proposals are lawmakers who represent farmers and hunters who use guns regularly.

 

State Rep. John Bradley, D-Marion, is among a handful of lawmakers pushing to give Illinoisans concealed carry rights. Another backer of concealed weapons, state Rep. Aaron Schock, a Peoria Republican and candidate for Congress, was not on the House floor Tuesday.

 

"It's an ongoing war," Bradley said.

 

The "war" is complicated by Gov. Rod Blagojevich's veto power. The Chicago Democrat favors gun control, and overriding him takes a two-thirds majority of lawmakers.

 

There is little doubt about the governor's position on concealed carry laws.

 

"As the governor has said before ? allowing more people to carry concealed weapons would be the wrong way to go in Illinois," said Blagojevich spokeswoman Abby Ottenhoff.

 

"We need to balance the right of sportsmen and hunters to legally own guns with the need to help law enforcement and protect the public from gun violence," Ottenhoff added.

 

Illinois State Police spokesman Scott Compton said his department has opposed concealed-carry proposals in the past because training levels required for a private citizen to use a weapon wouldn't near the training officers get.

 

Compton said officers are trained on both how to use a gun, and when it's appropriate to do so.

 

"It's something we practice on a continuous basis," he said.

 

A group of mostly female concealed carry supporters delivered a memo to Blagojevich's office asking him to support it. But the governor has been a critic of concealed carry in the past.

 

mike.riopell@lee.net / (217) 789-0865@lee.net / (217) 789-0865

 

The Illinois State Police have had an anti 2A stance for at least 30 years,and for Scott Compton to state that they are better qualified to carry weapons than a vetran especially a combat vetran is a joke,and I know many ISP are combat vetrans themselves and would not agree with Compton in that regard.I understand that he was speaking of ordinary citizens,and he ignors the fact that many are combat vets for his own reasons ,reasons that leave us at the mercy of violent criminals unless we are at home and armed....When you realy need a cop you can seldom if ever find one until it is to late and for Mr.Compton to basically state that an honist citizen should be denied the right of self defence while he and his fellow officers are permitted such a right is in and of itself a violation of the Constitution,"Life Liberty and the Persuit of Happiness",after all what good is Liberty or the Persuit of Happiness when you have been rendered helpless to defend yourself or others....I guess he would prefer that you just die quietly and in a manner that would justify his requests for more funding for law non-enforcement,good wages at little risk....I have met many ISP under various circumstances and have found the lower ranking ones for the most part to be decent LEO's.It is Lieutenant and up that seem to have a totalitarian mindset....IMHO.

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Pitching this as as a concern of "farmers and hunters" totally marginalizes the issue. It's a strategy indended to downplay the significance and relevance of these issues.

 

Farmers and hunters are very important....but give me a break!

 

They simply want to avoid the real issues.

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Now I understand where I got confused about the Bloomington paper mentioning me, here's the article from today's Herald & Review:

 

Herald & Review (Decatur, IL)

 

March 12, 2008

Section: News

Page: A6

 

Lawmakers take another shot at changing gun laws

Some aim for more restrictions while others hope to carry concealed

 

MIKE RIOPELL

 

H&R Springfield Bureau Writer

 

SPRINGFIELD - The issue draws the ire of thousands on either side, but lawmakers acknowledge that the political realities of Springfield mean changes in state gun laws could be tough this year. Tuesday brought thousands of activists to the Illinois State Capitol, asking lawmakers to resist putting more restrictions on gun ownership. They also called for laws that would allow private citizens to carry concealed weapons.

 

Dustin Meier of Decatur said he hoped the marching mass of activists got lawmakers� attention.

 

"It�s kind of a visual aid," he said.

 

State Sen. Bill Brady, R-Bloomington, was among lawmakers addressing a crowd on the Capitol steps that was organized by the Illinois State Rifle Association.

 

Brady said the differing opinions among lawmakers could leave them locked in a stalemate.

 

"It�s not going to be an easy year," he said.

 

Many lawmakers who represent areas dealing with gun violence in Chicago or other urban areas have tended in the past to propose gun control measures and oppose the idea of concealed carry.

 

Legislation pending in the General Assembly includes proposals for more licensing requirements and a ban on assault weapons.

 

At direct odds with those gun control proposals are lawmakers who represent farmers and hunters who use guns regularly.

 

State Rep. John Bradley, D-Marion, is among a handful of lawmakers pushing to give Illinoisans concealed carry rights.

 

"It�s an ongoing war," Bradley said.

 

The "war" is complicated by Gov. Rod Blagojevich�s veto power. The Chicago Democrat favors gun control, and overriding him takes a two-thirds majority of lawmakers.

 

There is little doubt about the governor�s position on concealed carry laws.

 

"As the governor has said before, allowing more people to carry concealed weapons would be the wrong way to go in Illinois," said Blagojevich spokeswoman Abby Ottenhoff.

 

"We need to balance the right of sportsmen and hunters to legally own guns with the need to help law enforcement and protect the public from gun violence," Ottenhoff added.

 

Illinois State Police spokesman Scott Compton said his department has opposed concealed-carry proposals in the past because training levels required for a private citizen to use a weapon wouldn�t near the training officers get.

 

Mike Riopell can be reached at mike.riopell@lee.net or 789-0865.

 

 

Copyright, 2008, Herald & Review, Decatur, IL

 

Dustin Meier of Decatur said he hoped the marching mass of activists got lawmakers' attention.

 

"It's kind of a visual aid," he said.[.quote]

 

Well, it's close enough to what I said...though I also said the visual aid was to give legislators a better understanding of the number of people they are affecting by infringing on our second amendment rights with the incomprehensible number of restrictive firearm laws; both current and proposed. But, like I said, close enough.

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WOW! lots of publicity this year. I can't believe the trib and daily herald actually wrote something. None of the chicago papers reported igold last year.

 

Here's the best comment i read so far (in the chicago tribune):

As your neighbor to the east, I highly encourage Illinois never to allow residents to carry concealed handguns.

 

You see, for many decades Indiana has allowed law-abiding residents to carry them, and criminals understand that nothing says no to a social deviant quite like a bullet hole in the chest.

 

With almost 400,000 Hoosiers carrying concealed handguns many of our rapists, muggers, mass killers, white-sheeted bigots, terrorists, gay bashers and anti-Semites have enough sense to leave Indiana and move to your state. The mass exodus of our criminals to Illinois helps ensure the continued well-being of Indiana residents -- even those who choose not to carry a handgun.

 

This might not be of much comfort to Illinoisians who will be victimized by these transplanted predators, but you can find solace in knowing that we appreciate your willingness to make yourselves available as easier targets of opportunity.

 

If it saves just one Hoosier life, it is worth it.

 

Sad but true!

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I checked Chicago Tribune and Sun-Times this morning. Not too surprisingly, nothing regarding IGOLD.

 

But the Trib has a video (regarding more CPD patroling Chicago schools) of Daley saying "we can tell people you cannot smoke....but where is the outrage by all the people about no guns in the hands of the people of America."

 

Sorry, I don't have a direct link to the video, but it's on the home page of the Trib.

 

Update - I found a link to the video:

 

http://www.chicagotribune.com/video/?clipI...;clipFormat=flv

 

This video needs to be captured and saved. Daley's remarks...no guns in the hands of the people of America. Is a clear cut, indisputable call for all guns to be totally ban in America.

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Article in the Southern this morning.

 

http://www.thesouthern.com/articles/2008/0...ge/23710529.txt

 

 

Gun laws might not see much change this year

by Mike Riopell, the southern springfield bureau

Tuesday, March 11, 2008 11:09 PM CDT

SPRINGFIELD - The issue draws the ire of thousands on either side, but lawmakers acknowledge that the political realities of Springfield mean changes in state gun laws could be tough to make happen this year.

 

Tuesday brought thousands of activists to the Illinois State Capitol asking lawmakers to resist putting more restrictions on gun ownership. They also called for laws that would allow private citizens to carry concealed weapons.

 

Dustin Meier of Decatur said he hoped the marching mass of activists got lawmakers' attention.

 

"It's kind of a visual aid," he said.

 

State Sen. Bill Brady, R-Bloomington, was among lawmakers addressing a crowd on the Capitol steps that was organized by the Illinois State Rifle Association.

 

Brady said the differing opinions among lawmakers could leave them locked in a stalemate.

 

"It's not going to be an easy year," he said.

 

Many lawmakers who represent areas dealing with gun violence in Chicago or other urban areas have tended in the past to propose gun control measures and oppose the idea of concealed carry.

 

Legislation pending in the General Assembly includes proposals for more licensing requirements and a ban on assault weapons.

 

At direct odds with those gun control proposals are lawmakers who represent farmers and hunters who use guns regularly.

 

State Rep. John Bradley, D-Marion, is among a handful of lawmakers pushing to give Illinoisans concealed carry rights. Another backer of concealed weapons, state Rep. Aaron Schock, a Peoria Republican and candidate for Congress, was not on the House floor Tuesday.

 

"It's an ongoing war," Bradley said.

 

The "war" is complicated by Gov. Rod Blagojevich's veto power. The Chicago Democrat favors gun control, and overriding him takes a two-thirds majority of lawmakers.

 

There is little doubt about the governor's position on concealed carry laws.

 

"As the governor has said before ? allowing more people to carry concealed weapons would be the wrong way to go in Illinois," said Blagojevich spokeswoman Abby Ottenhoff.

 

"We need to balance the right of sportsmen and hunters to legally own guns with the need to help law enforcement and protect the public from gun violence," Ottenhoff added.

 

Illinois State Police spokesman Scott Compton said his department has opposed concealed-carry proposals in the past because training levels required for a private citizen to use a weapon wouldn't near the training officers get.

 

Compton said officers are trained on both how to use a gun, and when it's appropriate to do so.

 

"It's something we practice on a continuous basis," he said.

 

A group of mostly female concealed carry supporters delivered a memo to Blagojevich's office asking him to support it. But the governor has been a critic of concealed carry in the past.

 

mike.riopell@lee.net / (217) 789-0865@lee.net / (217) 789-0865

 

@ the article.....Illinois State Police spokesman Scott Compton said his department has opposed concealed-carry proposals in the past because training levels required for a private citizen to use a weapon wouldn't near the training officers get.

 

Compton said officers are trained on both how to use a gun, and when it's appropriate to do so.

 

If that is the case, (which I don't believe so) then we need to verify what additional training these LEO's get that would be different. I would luv to see more information on the training of LEO's on the appropriate time to use a firearm. As it is, I remember more officers are shooting first, and asking questions later. I still remember the number of times and LEO has shot a kid who had a toy gun, and was not disciplined afterwords. Of course later laws were changed in such a manner as having the barrel of a toy gun painted with bright orange/red paint....yet this didn't stop the shootings.

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