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Clearing Your Home.......................


Matthew_W

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I suggest force on force training. You'll see how stupid the idea is when you try to do it against an opponent who knows you're coming.

Better to let someone wearing armor who has legal authority to fire a weapon in town handle it. If a cop's bullets penetrate the walls and exit the house it's not my problem.

 

If you're already in the house when you get a bump in the night that makes you feel the need to clear the house, barricade yourself in the room, call 911, tell them if you are armed and describe yourself and location. Let the cops handle it.

If you're outside the house choose not to go in and let the cops handle it.

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I suggest force on force training. You'll see how stupid the idea is when you try to do it against an opponent who knows you're coming.

Better to let someone wearing armor who has legal authority to fire a weapon in town handle it. If a cop's bullets penetrate the walls and exit the house it's not my problem.

If you're already in the house when you get a bump in the night that makes you feel the need to clear the house, barricade yourself in the room, call 911, tell them if you are armed and describe yourself and location. Let the cops handle it.

If you're outside the house choose not to go in and let the cops handle it.

Good advice. ^^^^^

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I can’t agree with this stay in one room mentality until the cops come 5-10 min later.

I have two babies, my house is small, and shuffling them all into one room will give up my position anyway. Which in turn will probably either interest the attention of someone that wants to do us harm, or scare the perp away.

 

Im not going to cower in my own home, it’s not about being a swat wannabe. I’m king of my castle, my queen will call the cops, while I make sure no one or thing gets between me and where my family sleeps.

 

Clearing your house in the dark is good practice anyway, so why wouldn’t you want to enhance your skills?

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I'm divorced, and kinda enjoy living in my Chicago bungalow alone.

 

You kinda skeered me - I thought the post said CLEANING my home - lol - not a fan of that either.

 

I freely admit to lacking the tacticool gene. Can't say I wish I had one either. I'll leave that nonsense for the 'wannabe's' and video game nerds.

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I can’t agree with this stay in one room mentality until the cops come 5-10 min later.

I have two babies, my house is small, and shuffling them all into one room will give up my position anyway. Which in turn will probably either interest the attention of someone that wants to do us harm, or scare the perp away.

 

Im not going to cower in my own home, it’s not about being a swat wannabe. I’m king of my castle, my queen will call the cops, while I make sure no one or thing gets between me and where my family sleeps.

 

Clearing your house in the dark is good practice anyway, so why wouldn’t you want to enhance your skills?

 

I have to agree with you here, I'm not going to cower in a single room while someone may be having free reign to my abode. Plus I've seen FOF training mentioned too, and if you watch this one video as an example, it will SHOW you why being a "sitting duck" CAN cost you your life. I understand it IS a little different because it's an "active shooter" and "workplace" example, but nonetheless it shows how being a "sitting duck" CAN indeed cost you your life.

 

If I'm not in the house already and I think someone is in it, I'm not too sure how I would respond to That. But if I'm already in the house, chances are I am not going to be found cowering under my bed (or anywhere for that matter)!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzagUGGBJa4

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Barricading into a room is not cowering. Let's be real. We carry guns for self protection so nobody who posts to this forum is likely going to cower to a threat. Barricading has a number of advantages that increase the likelihood that you'll survive the situation. None of us are the die hiding under our beds type.

 

Only having to cover a single point of entry is a huge advantage.

 

Being able to tell 911 exactly where you are is another...when the cops show up you're going to be far better served if they know the guy in the bedroom is armed, wearing only his boxers and flip-flops, and is the homeowner who called to request help. This may well keep you from being perforated by friendly fire.

 

Knowing how is different from actually doing it. Getting training on the various skills that range from long to bad breath short distance engagements, medical response, retention and disarming techniques, and unarmed resistance are all great things to know how to do...but just because you know doesn't mean you will engage. Knowing what's involved may actually keep you from utilizing your new skills.

 

I've done force on force training with CPD. I've tested ammunition from all my guns through multiple simulated walls so I'd know the penetration potential. I've taken rifle, carbine, pistol and medical response training. I've studied shootouts and legal aftermath of shootings. I'm always left with feeling the more I learn the more I learn how much I have to learn. There was a day in the not so distant past when I would have been in the search your own house camp. You'd expect that after getting the training on how to do this kind of thing properly (and what can go wrong) that I'd be even more in the search and clear camp...but I'm not. I'm a firm believer that not getting in a gunfight is the best way to stay alive. I won't seek one out in public. I won't seek one out at home either. I've got insurance for stuff that can be replaced. I'm not killing somebody over a TV. I'm not going to jail for accidentally shooting a neighbor through a wall. I can't be replaced. My wife can't be replaced. We'll barricade and defend, and yes, should it be put upon us meet violence head on with justified force, but we will not ever seek out the confrontation.

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I can’t agree with this stay in one room mentality until the cops come 5-10 min later.

I have two babies, my house is small, and shuffling them all into one room will give up my position anyway. Which in turn will probably either interest the attention of someone that wants to do us harm, or scare the perp away.

 

Im not going to cower in my own home, it’s not about being a swat wannabe. I’m king of my castle, my queen will call the cops, while I make sure no one or thing gets between me and where my family sleeps.

 

Clearing your house in the dark is good practice anyway, so why wouldn’t you want to enhance your skills?

Yes sir!

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Barricading into a room is not cowering. Let's be real. We carry guns for self protection so nobody who posts to this forum is likely going to cower to a threat. Barricading has a number of advantages that increase the likelihood that you'll survive the situation. None of us are the die hiding under our beds type.

 

Only having to cover a single point of entry is a huge advantage.

 

Being able to tell 911 exactly where you are is another...when the cops show up you're going to be far better served if they know the guy in the bedroom is armed, wearing only his boxers and flip-flops, and is the homeowner who called to request help. This may well keep you from being perforated by friendly fire.

 

Knowing how is different from actually doing it. Getting training on the various skills that range from long to bad breath short distance engagements, medical response, retention and disarming techniques, and unarmed resistance are all great things to know how to do...but just because you know doesn't mean you will engage. Knowing what's involved may actually keep you from utilizing your new skills.

 

I've done force on force training with CPD. I've tested ammunition from all my guns through multiple simulated walls so I'd know the penetration potential. I've taken rifle, carbine, pistol and medical response training. I've studied shootouts and legal aftermath of shootings. I'm always left with feeling the more I learn the more I learn how much I have to learn. There was a day in the not so distant past when I would have been in the search your own house camp. You'd expect that after getting the training on how to do this kind of thing properly (and what can go wrong) that I'd be even more in the search and clear camp...but I'm not. I'm a firm believer that not getting in a gunfight is the best way to stay alive. I won't seek one out in public. I won't seek one out at home either. I've got insurance for stuff that can be replaced. I'm not killing somebody over a TV. I'm not going to jail for accidentally shooting a neighbor through a wall. I can't be replaced. My wife can't be replaced. We'll barricade and defend, and yes, should it be put upon us meet violence head on with justified force, but we will not ever seek out the confrontation.

That sounds like (1) good tactically sound plan to have in your home defense repertoire. Knowing how to "clear" your house is another. I used the quotes because using the word "clear" invokes the OP-R-8-RZ RULZ gag reflex. I get it.

 

But, choosing a single plan for defense is a plan for failure. If a guy is in your living room with matches, a can of gas and a machete in the midst of a psychotic break, barricading in the bedroom isn't the right choice.

 

I don't think you're disagreeing with that necessarily, I've just responded to your post for the sake of discussion.

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@tk

Interesting point.

 

I do have a dog. She's not exactly the GSD we used to have that made people cross the street before they passed our yard, but she alerts before the bad guy is inside the house he doesn't know if she's all bark.

I suppose I should get that emergency escape ladder installed because my house is toast under your scenario. Putting myself in the shoes of that arsonist wouldn't have the arsonist inside the house being set alight. Seems like poor planning to stand so close to a dog, two armed homeowners, and fire...and accomplishing the task of burning a house is safer from outside through a broken window. But I'm not an arsonist so maybe I can't channel that level of crazy with 6sigma efficiency logic.

Other than that, I suppose the house is like a TV in that it's insured. And heck, if it went up I'd surely have to consider why someone was trying to kill me or my wife before we rebuilt. Might make sense to get far away from Illinois in the process with one arsonist setting the stage to leave the dumpster fire that is Ilinois taxes and politics.

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Our 135lbs Great Dane does a wonderful job of letting us know if anything is going bump in the night. When she stand up on her rear legs, she is over six feet tall and with a deep bark that can be heard all around the neighborhood.

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Years ago there was a thread here about wearing hearing protection in the event of an intruder. Having electronic muffs could work to your advantage. Wondering who, if any, that do want to be responsible for clearing the house is using them?

 

IMO, getting the family in to one same, safe place in the house together is most important to me. Call it in, explain your position and description, and let them come in to clear it. As mentioned by another post guarding only one entry is much easier than moving down hallways and around corners.

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Once in a blue moon. I know my house better than a bad guy. I know the blind corners, the mirrors, and which planks of the hardwood floors creak.

 

Realistically, "most" of the time something goes bump....it isn't a bad guy. It could be the house settling, a critter on the roof, the furnace doing something, or something silly like a picture (or surround sound speaker) that ended up falling because it needed an anchor. I don't want to gather the kids in the middle of the night and call the police over something like that.

 

We have a dog that would help alert us...but that would be the extent of her help....assuming she didn't go to the bad guy and beg for a treat and a tummy rub.

 

It really would depend on the situation.

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