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Euler

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  1. The case is Camacho v The Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District filed in the Federal District Court of Western Texas. CNN
  2. Unless the ban applies to Highwood, the case against Red Dot will fail on the facts. The process is the punishment, though.
  3. Just a random afterthought, but it seems a little bizarre that you could have asked unknown people and that would have been more trustworthy than relying on the police.
  4. Your CCL won't expire at least until after the pandemic state of emergency ends, which might be never. The only condition you have to meet to qualify for the indefinite extension is to apply for renewal, which you have done.
  5. 720 ILCS 5/24-3(g) calls it "withholding delivery of the firearm for at least 72 hours after application for its purchase has been made." That's generally interpreted to mean 72 hours from the time the seller agrees to the sale, although many brick-and-mortar FFLs enforce it as 72 hours from when you fill out a 4473 and make you go back a second time. The seller may ask you to send him a copy of your FOID (or at least your FOID number) and more just to make sure you're not wasting his time.
  6. Both LGS and private seller have to check your FOID validity, keep a record of the sale, and make you wait 3 days. A private seller doesn't require you to fill out a federal form that eventually gets filed with the ATF, who keeps it forever to enter into their searchable not-technically-a-registry database of all gun owners and the guns they own, nor does a private seller contact the ISP to run a federal background check on you, possibly resulting in the ATF knocking on your door without a warrant to ask you to consent to a search to see if you still have the firearm or any other firearm or if maybe you gave it to a local drug dealing gang member, domestic terrorist, or other member of an extra-judicial watchlist.
  7. Every time you look at it, you can remind yourself that having the same physical card forever and ever was the goal for which ISRA bargained away private transfers.
  8. A civil case needs to be able to demonstrate harm. Anyone under 18 hasn't been harmed by state law, since federal law prohibits firearm purchases for them. The case would be dismissed. I think the way to do it is either to try to get such a case certified as a class action, so saying everyone 18-20 is harmed, or to bring the case as a facial challenge, again saying everyone 18-20 is harmed. A class action would be a tough sell. There would need to be an endless stream of single-plaintiff cases, each of which could unfortunately be mooted after 3 years. Also courts strongly prefer as-applied challenges to facial challenges.
  9. Check the box rental agreement before renting. Many banks don't allow storing firearms. There's no law. It's just their policy.
  10. I'd presume he surrendered them to his local PD. IANAL, but I believe you need to request that the police return them. Did they give you a receipt when you surrendered them? Start there. Ask nicely. If a verbal request doesn't work, you probably need to request the return in writing, like a certified letter. They may choose to ignore a letter from you. You may need to get a lawyer to send it for them to take it seriously. If that doesn't work, you'll need to get a court to order them to return the firearms. If you do nothing, you run the risk of the police declaring them abandoned and destroying them. For future reference, when someone gets their FOID revoked, they don't need to dispossess themselves of their firearms to the cops. They just need to dispossess themselves of their firearms, which can be to a friend or family member (or their lawyer, if they have one).
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