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Standing question

standing law

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#1 mab22

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 09:41 PM

I thought there was a post some where on Illinois carry site that either "public interest" or "Public good" was given by an Illinois appellate court as grounds for standing.

If anyone is familiar with an Illinois court ruling with regards to this or knows the post or case I would appreciate it. Maybe federal district?

 

Thank you.



#2 ChicagoRonin70

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 09:42 PM

I seem to remember something about that, as well. Don't know where I saw it, but I was looking for it for referring to it myself, for another posting. Couldn't find it, though.


"A well educated Media, being necessary for the preservation of a free State, the right of the people to keep and read books, shall not be infringed."

 

"A well regulated Militia, being necessary for the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."

 

Who gets to keep and read books? The Media? Or is it the People?

 

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#3 Bubbacs

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:26 AM

I always considered STANDING to be my right, whether the public was interested or if it was good for me!
That being said, I did tend to sit a lot before my open heart in December.
But now STANDING is a daily routine for me through out the day!

#4 Quiet Observer

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 01:17 PM

I thought there was a post some where on Illinois carry site that either "public interest" or "Public good" was given by an Illinois appellate court as grounds for standing.

If anyone is familiar with an Illinois court ruling with regards to this or knows the post or case I would appreciate it. Maybe federal district?

 

Thank you.

 

Are you asking about the right to  "stand your ground" in defensive situations?



#5 chislinger

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Posted 15 March 2019 - 01:53 PM

I thought there was a post some where on Illinois carry site that either "public interest" or "Public good" was given by an Illinois appellate court as grounds for standing.
If anyone is familiar with an Illinois court ruling with regards to this or knows the post or case I would appreciate it. Maybe federal district?
 
Thank you.

 
Are you asking about the right to  "stand your ground" in defensive situations?

Legal standing, which is required to pursue a lawsuit. It's a complicated subject and not one I understand well at all.

https://www.law.corn...du/wex/standing
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#6 Silhouette

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Posted 15 March 2019 - 02:32 PM

The US doesn't have public interest standing as some other countries do.  However, organizations can represent their members, and in some instances, someone can represent the rights of others if they have been injured -- this is often allowed if the other injured parties would not be able to seek redress themselves.

 

For example, an 18 y/o denied an FOID for lack of a parents signature might have their case languish for 3 years such that they turn 21 and could get an FOID without a parent's signature.  The court, recognizing that the next 18 y/o would also have their case languish for years, may allow the case to continue even if the standing question becomes murky due to the plaintiff turning 21.  Horsley v. Trame was nearly in this situation.


Edited by Silhouette, 15 March 2019 - 02:32 PM.





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