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Exemption for Sparta World Shooting Complex signed into law


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#1 InterestedBystander

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 05:37 PM

full story at link

http://senategop.sta...aw/news-detail/

...Events at the Sparta World Shooting and Recreation Complex will have new protections to allow them to continue to attract large events and vendors, due to legislation co-sponsored by State Senator Paul Schimpf (R-Waterloo) that was signed into law on July 12th.

This is the result of Southern Illinois leaders coming together and working to protect an important local economic driver from over-burdensome state rules, said Schimpf. This new law will help protect the future of the Sparta complex by ensuring that it will be able to continue to draw world-class events.

Senate Bill 1139 provides specific exemptions for businesses and firearms sales at WSRC events that would have been severely effected, limited, or outright banned by the Gun Dealer Licensing Act.

Without the exemptions, the Gun Dealer Licensing Act would have increased costs and administrative burdens for many of the vendors that typically set up during events at the World Shooting Complex in Sparta. These new regulations could have led to national shooting events choosing a different venue. Senator Schimpf voted against the Gun Dealer Licensing Act.

In addition, the legislation also updates concealed carry regulations and allows current and retired police officers to carry while hunting.

I would like to thank Governor Pritzker for recognizing the importance of the WSRC to the area and signing this legislation into law, said Schimpf....
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#2 Black Flag

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 05:57 PM

Thank goodness we protected the temporary business of selling elite shotguns to elite out-of-towners while running the bread-n-butter gun shops, the ones serving the voters, right off the table.


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#3 chislinger

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 06:06 PM

Boycott the place.
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#4 Patriots & Tyrants

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 07:08 PM

So every little special interest big enough to line politicians pockets is gonna get an exemption, swell.

 

 

This is exactly the precedent Springfield Armor and RRA started.



#5 Bubbacs

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 08:22 PM

If an exemption is cool with JB, then why sign the original bill?
Why not just ask FFL’s to pony up say $3500.00 each year to a slush fund for these politicians and be done with it?
Then there shouldn’t be a dealer license bs law!

Sounds like the souther boys are gonna be just like Crook County soon, slicing out their own pie......

#6 herrmannd

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 06:08 AM

I believe this is still a state owned facility, so they don't want to loose any revenue. It is a huge multi million dollar place that includes many many pistol bays, camper hook-ups, nature preserve, and shotgun areas. IDPA, USPSA, Trap, and other major events have been held there. The exemption is a good thing. The fact that any such exemption is needed however, is tyrannical.



#7 herrmannd

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 06:09 AM

https://www.dnr.illi...es/default.aspx



#8 ScottFM

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 06:23 AM

So every little special interest big enough to line politicians pockets is gonna get an exemption, swell.

 

 

This is exactly the precedent Springfield Armor and RRA started.

That is our system of government. Pay to play! 

 

 

To paraphrase: 

 

Government of the special interests by the special interests for the special interests!


Edited by ScottFM, 16 July 2019 - 06:24 AM.

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#9 evilbrownrifle

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 08:54 AM

IMO no exemptions. We are a large, dis unified group of gun owners. We all need to be in the same boat. It's too easy for too many to feel "safe."



#10 mikew

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 01:39 PM

We are a large, dis unified group of gun owners. We all need to be in the same boat. It's too easy for too many to feel "safe."

See? We are all in the same boat.   We're all gun owners.



#11 bmyers

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 03:19 PM

Would this give an FFL grounds to sue because of unfair business practices by the State?


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#12 chislinger

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 04:05 PM

IMO no exemptions. We are a large, dis unified group of gun owners. We all need to be in the same boat. It's too easy for too many to feel "safe."


Exactly! We should put pressure on groups that use the facility to go elsewhere (out of state) since they are presumably pro-2A. Challenge them to stand with us. And wake up the FUDDs.
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#13 FST_Kent

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Posted 17 July 2019 - 08:29 AM

Sparta already had exemptions for firearm sales, but the licensing bill messed it up and they had to fix it.



#14 Kenny

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 08:40 AM

Because anybody coming in from out of state has a lot more invested in the state than a dealer that has been in IL for a while!!


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#15 Raw Power

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 08:48 AM

So every little special interest big enough to line politicians pockets is gonna get an exemption, swell.

 

 

This is exactly the precedent Springfield Armor and RRA started.

 

Exactly what I thought when reading this.



#16 FST_Kent

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 08:59 AM

Because anybody coming in from out of state has a lot more invested in the state than a dealer that has been in IL for a while!!

 

I agree.  The members of the state legislature should be focused on working for the citizens of IL they represent, not to benefit interests from out of state.

 

I don't believe the Sparta complex has paid for itself, let alone become an economic boon to the area as promised.



#17 Onytay

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 03:06 PM

 

Because anybody coming in from out of state has a lot more invested in the state than a dealer that has been in IL for a while!!

 

I agree.  The members of the state legislature should be focused on working for the citizens of IL they represent, not to benefit interests from out of state.

 

I don't believe the Sparta complex has paid for itself, let alone become an economic boon to the area as promised.

 

While the facility may not have paid for itself yet, and that is because the state underutilizes it. Come down here during any one of the big shoots and then try to tell me that the local economy isn't benefiting.

 

Being a dealer from the area and having paid the extortion fee required by the state I find it appalling that the complex got an exemption.


Edited by Onytay, 19 July 2019 - 03:10 PM.


#18 FST_Kent

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 07:04 PM

I've been to the complex several times during the Grand.  I know dozens of trap shooters who attend every year and they bring most everything with them in their big RV's.  It seemed to be the norm for most people less than a day's drive from the complex.

 

 

https://herald-revie...347195e7c1.html

 

The sprawling 1,600-acre complex was borne largely out of a desire by anti-gun politicians, led by former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, to curry favor among pro-gun voters in the southern part of the state. Of course, they didn’t need to build the largest shooting range in the nation to do that, but the quest to score points with downstate voters coincided with the opportunity to attract one of the country’s largest shooting events: the Amateur Trap Association’s Grand American.

 

The state spent more than $2 million buying a former coal strip mine and started building. By the time it was over, the estimated $30 million price tag had ballooned to $50 million.

 

What it was supposed to do was generate as much as $100 million annually in economic impact for the region, but from the start, it drew criticism as being little more than a pork project.

 

A decade later, the facility doesn’t come close to meeting those economic predictions that accompanied its construction. The trap association’s events are, by far, the biggest activities taking place at the range, with an estimated $27 million in economic impact. Other events are much smaller, often with shooters only staying around town for the day.

 

Operationally, it’s a money-loser as well, costing about $3 million a year, including debt service, to run. It brings in about $1.1 million a year in revenue, according to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

 

Supporters, however, are quick to argue that the range isn’t all that different from a convention center, designed to boost the surrounding the economy, even as it loses money.

 

And for Sparta, a town with 4,300 residents, there’s a clear benefit, according to Rheinecker, the city manager.

 

 



#19 Onytay

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 08:04 PM

 

I've been to the complex several times during the Grand.  I know dozens of trap shooters who attend every year and they bring most everything with them in their big RV's.  It seemed to be the norm for most people less than a day's drive from the complex.

 

 

https://herald-revie...347195e7c1.html

 

The sprawling 1,600-acre complex was borne largely out of a desire by anti-gun politicians, led by former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, to curry favor among pro-gun voters in the southern part of the state. Of course, they didn’t need to build the largest shooting range in the nation to do that, but the quest to score points with downstate voters coincided with the opportunity to attract one of the country’s largest shooting events: the Amateur Trap Association’s Grand American.

 

The state spent more than $2 million buying a former coal strip mine and started building. By the time it was over, the estimated $30 million price tag had ballooned to $50 million.

 

What it was supposed to do was generate as much as $100 million annually in economic impact for the region, but from the start, it drew criticism as being little more than a pork project.

 

A decade later, the facility doesn’t come close to meeting those economic predictions that accompanied its construction. The trap association’s events are, by far, the biggest activities taking place at the range, with an estimated $27 million in economic impact. Other events are much smaller, often with shooters only staying around town for the day.

 

Operationally, it’s a money-loser as well, costing about $3 million a year, including debt service, to run. It brings in about $1.1 million a year in revenue, according to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

 

Supporters, however, are quick to argue that the range isn’t all that different from a convention center, designed to boost the surrounding the economy, even as it loses money.

 

And for Sparta, a town with 4,300 residents, there’s a clear benefit, according to Rheinecker, the city manager.

 

 

 

I don't care what that biased report says. I have lived in this area my entire life and have worked in Sparta for the last 20 years. It is obvious when the big shoots are going on. Every hotel for miles is booked and restaurants are thriving. Traffic increase is obvious and easily identified with the abundance of out of state plates. Sparta is not the only town that benefits and because it cant handle the need for hotel rooms many shooters are forced to go as far as O'fallon and Fairview heights for rooms. The complex could make so much more money if they would manage the grounds correctly and bring in more events beside shoots. While many shooters camp onsite there are many who stay in hotels, B&Bs and I know of several people who rent there houses out and go on vacation during grand week. I am a shooter and have shot thousands of clays at the complex since it opened, I would rather see the state sell it or allow private management to run the place, then it could become what it should have been from the start. .  



#20 FST_Kent

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 08:27 PM

I would rather see the state sell it or allow private management to run the place, then it could become what it should have been from the start. .

 

 

Yes, your part of the state is reaping benefits off the rest of the state's back.  The complex isn't paid for and it costs IL taxpayers almost 2 million a year to keep it open.

 

I agree, the communities that benefit should buy it and pay the tax payers back.



#21 Onytay

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 09:45 PM

 

I would rather see the state sell it or allow private management to run the place, then it could become what it should have been from the start. .

 

 

Yes, your part of the state is reaping benefits off the rest of the state's back.  The complex isn't paid for and it costs IL taxpayers almost 2 million a year to keep it open.

 

I agree, the communities that benefit should buy it and pay the tax payers back.

 

Wow.... I'm sure all the tax dollars collected from the southern part of the state are actually spent there. Again, mismanagement by the state just like most other state parks. When the state shuttered the complex a few years ago a private firm offered to buy it and run it. The state refused, if its such crappy money pit why wouldn't the state sell it and be done with it?


Edited by Onytay, 19 July 2019 - 09:49 PM.


#22 FST_Kent

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Posted 20 July 2019 - 08:51 AM

Wow.... I'm sure all the tax dollars collected from the southern part of the state are actually spent there.

 

 

I agree, your tax dollars and mine shouldn't go to Chicago and their tax dollars should not go to you or me.  Just how local property taxes pay for local school districts.

 

Never said it was a crappy facility.  I'm just quoting the numbers the DNR releases that show it's always operated at a loss.  Would you still be in business if you built a 50 million dollar facility that makes 1.1 million a year, but costs 3 million to operate for the last 13 yrs?

 

 

Would you feel the same way if the state subsidized facility were built a few hours farther north and a different community reaped the benefits and got special rules?

 

Also, I'm just curious.  Who was this private group that offered to buy the facility?  I do a search and find nothing.



#23 FST_Kent

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 08:00 AM

Wow.... I'm sure all the tax dollars collected from the southern part of the state are actually spent there

 

 

Turns out you couldn't be more wrong.  Southern IL, for the most part, gets more than their fair share of taxes sent to Springfield.according to the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale released a study that looks at how much money each county receives in comparison to how much they send to state coffers.

 

This is posted in the DIVORCE topic too.

 

https://opensiuc.lib...text=ppi_papers

 

Scroll down to page 34 and see that Randolph County gets back $3.08 for every dollar sent to Springfield.  The highest in your region.  Bet you feel sorry for those poor ******** in Monroe County that only get 49 cents back, the lowest in your region. 

 

My small(sq mi) rural county up north, Grundy, is the 2nd lowest in it's region only getting .48 cents back for every dollar.  With a population of just over 50K we send over $147 million to Springfield and only receives a little over $70 million.

 

At a population of just over 32K, Randolph county sends a little over $58 million to Springfield and receives over $180 million..

 

Wow!

 

Here's a quote from your state rep last fall.

 

https://www.bnd.com/...e217665185.html

 

Even though Monroe Co. is listed as one of the 10 "richest" counties per capita, your former Rep Costello:said this:

 

He said he was surprised Monroe didn’t get as much back.

 

“I work very hard to make sure Southern Illinois receives its fair share, and gets what it’s due. This is something I will be trying to address,” Costello said.

 



#24 chislinger

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 07:05 PM

I never understood that argument. If the goal is to get back what you sent then why send it at all?
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#25 FST_Kent

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 07:38 PM

I never understood that argument. If the goal is to get back what you sent then why send it at all?

 

I never made that argument. 

 

Just pointed out how wrong this statement was.

 

Wow.... I'm sure all the tax dollars collected from the southern part of the state are actually spent there

 

.

In reality, it's not possible for a county to get back all the taxes it sends.  The state itself has lots of bills to paid from those taxes.  The study actually points out that the 80% Cook Co receives is actually the break even point.

 

So if you adjust for that, my county is actually getting 60% and Randolph Co is getting 385% .



#26 Glock23

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 08:08 PM

Based on my county getting back 200%, coupled with the fact that there is virtually nothing in this county, I'm guessing a lot of it is for farm subsidies or something...
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#27 FST_Kent

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 09:19 PM

72.5% of my county is harvested farmland per the IL Soybean Assoc.. Pretty rural I'd say.  So, using the agriculture argument, we're probably not getting our  "fair" share.



#28 Glock23

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 09:45 PM

72.5% of my county is harvested farmland per the IL Soybean Assoc.. Pretty rural I'd say.  So, using the agriculture argument, we're probably not getting our  "fair" share.

Ours is 84.6% cropland according to the 2012 Ag census.
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#29 FST_Kent

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 10:24 PM

What county, I'm curious.  It's tough to find a county the size of mine that isn't heavily wooded.

 

Grundy is a smaller one at 69th in size at 419.9 sq miles

https://www.indexmun...land-area#chart

 

27th in population with just over 50K.

 

Also, my town, the biggest in the county at just under 15K received re-certification from the USDA this winter as eligible for rural development loans and grants.  So, we're rural.

 

And while we're at it, Randolph Co is 27.4% larger in physical size than my county and has only 53.2% in farm production.



#30 Glock23

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 10:47 PM

What county, I'm curious.  It's tough to find a county the size of mine that isn't heavily wooded.
 
Grundy is a smaller one at 69th in size at 419.9 sq miles
https://www.indexmun...land-area#chart
 
27th in population with just over 50K.
 
Also, my town, the biggest in the county at just under 15K received re-certification from the USDA this winter as eligible for rural development loans and grants.  So, we're rural.

Macoupin.

84.6% cropland
7.9% wooded
7.5% other uses

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