Jump to content


Photo

HB5939


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 GP4L

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 55 posts
  • Joined: 21-December 17

Posted 08 August 2018 - 01:24 PM

http://www.ilga.gov/...cSess=&Session=

 

"Amends the Criminal Code of 2012. Provides that a person commits the offense of unlawful use of weapons when he knowingly sells, manufactures, purchases, possesses, or carries a firearm with: (1) a major component of which, if subjected to inspection by common metal detection devices, would not be detectable; or (2) a major component of which, if subjected to inspection by common imaging detection devices, would not generate an image that accurately depicts the shape of the component. Provides that this offense is a Class 2 felony. Creates exemptions. Effective immediately."

 

"i) a major component of which, if subjected to inspection by common metal detection devices, would not be detectable; or (ii) a major component of which, if subjected to inspection by common imaging detection devices, would not generate an image that accurately depicts the shape of the component."

 

"11.5), "major component" includes, but is not limited to, the slide, cylinder, barrel, frame, or receiver of the firearm, and does not include any item attached to the major component that is capable of being removed or that is unnecessary for the functioning of the firearm;"

 

Pages 6 and 7, to my knowledge are where the new text has been added. 

 

Sounds like it's intended to target "3D printed" "guns" and polymer frame should be OK, as they often have metal in them, and are probably seen by "imaging" devices anyways.  But the wording seems a little sketchy...  

Thoughts?



#2 mic6010

    Member

  • Members
  • 1,612 posts
  • Joined: 04-January 14

Posted 08 August 2018 - 01:40 PM

Sounds like this would ban all 80% percent polymer pistol frames and polymer AR-15 lower receivers. Both of which are legally and readily purchased by a great many gun enthusiasts currently.

 

And of course this law will do absolutely nothing from stopping someone from purchasing a 3d printer and printing up a firearm or component with it. Which I'm not even sure why that's being made illegal anyways. If I buy a hunk of metal and a lathe nobody cares what I make with it, but you start talking about "3D printers" and everything needs to be banned.

But I guess it wouldn't be an anti gun law if it both didn't make any sense and only targeted law abiding gun owners simultaneously. 


Edited by mic6010, 08 August 2018 - 01:49 PM.

"Living in Chicago, it used to be, 'don't go out at night,' or 'be more careful at night'. Now it's turned into a place where it doesn't matter if it's day or night."  - John Hendricks.


#3 Euler

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 774 posts
  • Joined: 26-February 18

Posted 08 August 2018 - 01:50 PM

Sounds like it's intended to target "3D printed" "guns" and polymer frame should be OK, as they often have metal in them, and are probably seen by "imaging" devices anyways. But the wording seems a little sketchy...
Thoughts?


The polymer frame is OK if it's made by a licensed manufacturer.

This paragraph (11.5) does not not apply to:

(1) a firearm received by, in the possession of, or under the control of the United States federal government;

(2) the manufacture, importation, possession, transfer, receipt, shipment, or delivery of a firearm by a licensed manufacturer or licensed importer under an existing contract with the United States federal government;

(3) the manufacture, possession, transfer, receipt, shipment, or delivery of a firearm by a licensed manufacturer or any person acting under a contract with a licensed manufacturer, for the purpose of examining and testing a firearm to determine whether a firearm is detectable by common metal detection devices or common image detection devices; or

(4) a firearm manufactured in, imported into, or possessed in the United States before the date of the enactment of the Undetectable Firearms Act of 1988.


Also, "undetectable" is mostly about metal detectors, anyway. Nothing is invisible to optical (i.e., backscatter x-ray) imaging. There are some pocket-carry folding pistols that look like cell phones when they're folded. I suppose this law would outlaw them.

Edited by Euler, 08 August 2018 - 01:51 PM.


#4 Xwing

    Member

  • Members
  • 8,922 posts
  • Joined: 26-February 09

Posted 08 August 2018 - 02:19 PM

 

Sounds like it's intended to target "3D printed" "guns" and polymer frame should be OK, as they often have metal in them, and are probably seen by "imaging" devices anyways. But the wording seems a little sketchy...
Thoughts?


The polymer frame is OK if it's made by a licensed manufacturer.

This paragraph (11.5) does not not apply to:

(1) a firearm received by, in the possession of, or under the control of the United States federal government;

(2) the manufacture, importation, possession, transfer, receipt, shipment, or delivery of a firearm by a licensed manufacturer or licensed importer under an existing contract with the United States federal government;

(3) the manufacture, possession, transfer, receipt, shipment, or delivery of a firearm by a licensed manufacturer or any person acting under a contract with a licensed manufacturer, for the purpose of examining and testing a firearm to determine whether a firearm is detectable by common metal detection devices or common image detection devices; or

(4) a firearm manufactured in, imported into, or possessed in the United States before the date of the enactment of the Undetectable Firearms Act of 1988.

 


Also, "undetectable" is mostly about metal detectors, anyway. Nothing is invisible to optical (i.e., backscatter x-ray) imaging. There are some pocket-carry folding pistols that look like cell phones when they're folded. I suppose this law would outlaw them.

 

 

No, per (3) it would be ok for the manufacturer to possess it, but not us mere mortals.  Similar to how a licensed manufacturer can possess an automatic firearm (aka machine gun) in Illinois, but no-one else in Illinois outside of LE can.


NRA Lifetime Member
IGOLD 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
CCW - 50 State Firearm Laws: (Android), (iPhone/iPad)
Posted anti-gun business listing: (Android), (iPhone/iPad)
Gun Range Tools & Logs: (Android), (iPhone/iPad)
Illinois Government: (Android), (iPhone/iPad)





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users