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Double edge knives legal in Il?


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#1 Ranger

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 08:26 AM

Are they legal to carry in IL?

#2 C0untZer0

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 09:06 AM

Something is not illegal unless it specifically prohibited by a law.  I'm not aware of a state law that expressly forbids carrying a knife that has both sides of the blade sharpened, I'd say that they're not made illegal by any state law that I know of.

 

There are dozens and dozens of municipal laws outlawing all kinds of knives based on their length or opening action (automatic).  Its far more likely that you'll be tripped up by some municipal law than a state law regarding knives.


 

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#3 OldMarineVet

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 09:28 AM

Agreed. Closest thing I can find is a "dagger" which is in 2)in the beginning of the statute:"

(2) Carries or possesses with intent to use the same unlawfully against another, a dagger, dirk, billy, dangerous knife, razor, stiletto, broken bottle or other piece of glass, stun gun or taser or any other dangerous or deadly weapon or instrument of like character; or"

=================================
(720 ILCS 5/24-1) (from Ch. 38, par. 24-1)
Sec. 24-1. Unlawful use of weapons.
(a) A person commits the offense of unlawful use of weapons when he knowingly:
(1) Sells, manufactures, purchases, possesses or carries any bludgeon, black-jack, slung-shot, sand-club, sand-bag, metal knuckles or other knuckle weapon regardless of its composition, throwing star, or any knife, commonly referred to as a switchblade knife, which has a blade that opens automatically by hand pressure applied to a button, spring or other device in the handle of the knife, or a ballistic knife, which is a device that propels a knifelike blade as a proj(2) Carries or possesses with intent to use the same unlawfully against another, a dagger, dirk, billy, dangerous knife, razor, stiletto, broken bottle or other piece of glass, stun gun or taser or any other dangerous or deadly weapon or instrument of like character; or
ectile by means of a coil spring, elastic material or compressed gas; or

http://www.ilga.gov/...=072000050K24-1
===============================
(Don't be concerned about the switchblade wording. Remember the coverage of the FOID is further down under "Exceptions.")

Even if somebody sharpens both sides of a blade I'd guess the reference to a "dagger" would be relevant since it's normally shortened on both sides to form the point.

dagger noun [ C ] us ​ /ˈdæɡ·ər/ a short, pointed knife that is sharp on both sides, used esp. in the past as a weapon

https://dictionary.c.../english/dagger

To be sure, I'd recommend consulting with a lawyer.

Edited by OldMarineVet, 17 November 2017 - 09:29 AM.


#4 stm

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 09:43 AM

It was always my understanding that the "dirk or dagger" language prohibited a double-edged blade. I can't remember where I picked up that nugget of info, though. I wonder if there is any case law on this. ETA: The prohibition on carrying a dirk or dagger only applies if you have intent to use it unlawfully against another.

Edited by stm, 17 November 2017 - 09:51 AM.

yea everyone makes fun of the redneck till the zombies show up. . .


#5 Yeti

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 09:54 AM

If you aren’t familiar with it, the LegalBlade phone app from Knife Rights is a good way to check state and local knife laws.

#6 BigJim

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 10:06 AM

Double edge knives are made for one thing only...  stabbing (killing) people!


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#7 kemikos

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 11:13 AM

ETA: The prohibition on carrying a dirk or dagger only applies if you have intent to use it unlawfully against another.


That's the answer right there. Same reason it's always been legal under state law to carry a hunting knife on your belt, even though it's a "dangerous knife" by the definition in the statute; intent is the key.

As others have said, what will trip you up is the municipal ordinances. Oak Forest is one that I know prohibits double-edged knives; I'm sure there are more.

#8 TomKoz

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 11:28 AM

Agreed. Closest thing I can find is a "dagger" which is in 2)in the beginning of the statute:"(2) Carries or possesses with intent to use the same unlawfully against another, a dagger, dirk, billy, dangerous knife, razor, stiletto, broken bottle or other piece of glass, stun gun or taser or any other dangerous or deadly weapon or instrument of like character; or"=================================(720 ILCS 5/24-1) (from Ch. 38, par. 24-1)Sec. 24-1. Unlawful use of weapons.(a) A person commits the offense of unlawful use of weapons when he knowingly:(1) Sells, manufactures, purchases, possesses or carries any bludgeon, black-jack, slung-shot, sand-club, sand-bag, metal knuckles or other knuckle weapon regardless of its composition, throwing star, or any knife, commonly referred to as a switchblade knife, which has a blade that opens automatically by hand pressure applied to a button, spring or other device in the handle of the knife, or a ballistic knife, which is a device that propels a knifelike blade as a proj(2) Carries or possesses with intent to use the same unlawfully against another, a dagger, dirk, billy, dangerous knife, razor, stiletto, broken bottle or other piece of glass, stun gun or taser or any other dangerous or deadly weapon or instrument of like character; orectile by means of a coil spring, elastic material or compressed gas; orhttp://www.ilga.gov/...=072000050K24-1===============================(Don't be concerned about the switchblade wording. Remember the coverage of the FOID is further down under "Exceptions.")Even if somebody sharpens both sides of a blade I'd guess the reference to a "dagger" would be relevant since it's normally shortened on both sides to form the point.dagger noun [ C ] us ​ /ˈdæɡ·ər/ a short, pointed knife that is sharp on both sides, used esp. in the past as a weaponhttps://dictionary.c.../english/daggerTo be sure, I'd recommend consulting with a lawyer.


A “SAND-BAG” is illegal???
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#9 lockman

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 12:35 PM

Only carrying one with intent to use it unlawfully is a crime. Carrying one for self defense is not a criminal act in under Illinois law.


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#10 OldMarineVet

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 12:56 PM

 

Agreed. Closest thing I can find is a "dagger" which is in 2)in the beginning of the statute:"(2) Carries or possesses with intent to use the same unlawfully against another, a dagger, dirk, billy, dangerous knife, razor, stiletto, broken bottle or other piece of glass, stun gun or taser or any other dangerous or deadly weapon or instrument of like character; or"=================================(720 ILCS 5/24-1) (from Ch. 38, par. 24-1)Sec. 24-1. Unlawful use of weapons.(a) A person commits the offense of unlawful use of weapons when he knowingly:(1) Sells, manufactures, purchases, possesses or carries any bludgeon, black-jack, slung-shot, sand-club, sand-bag, metal knuckles or other knuckle weapon regardless of its composition, throwing star, or any knife, commonly referred to as a switchblade knife, which has a blade that opens automatically by hand pressure applied to a button, spring or other device in the handle of the knife, or a ballistic knife, which is a device that propels a knifelike blade as a proj(2) Carries or possesses with intent to use the same unlawfully against another, a dagger, dirk, billy, dangerous knife, razor, stiletto, broken bottle or other piece of glass, stun gun or taser or any other dangerous or deadly weapon or instrument of like character; orectile by means of a coil spring, elastic material or compressed gas; orhttp://www.ilga.gov/...=072000050K24-1===============================(Don't be concerned about the switchblade wording. Remember the coverage of the FOID is further down under "Exceptions.")Even if somebody sharpens both sides of a blade I'd guess the reference to a "dagger" would be relevant since it's normally shortened on both sides to form the point.dagger noun [ C ] us ​ /ˈdæɡ·ər/ a short, pointed knife that is sharp on both sides, used esp. in the past as a weaponhttps://dictionary.c.../english/daggerTo be sure, I'd recommend consulting with a lawyer.


A “SAND-BAG” is illegal???

 

I believe a sand-bag and a sand-club are both blackjack-like weapons made with sand. 



#11 patriot1776

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 01:40 PM

Just great , some municipalities , illegal to carry a knife with a certain length blade and a double edge but legal to carry a loaded gun .



#12 drumgod

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 01:45 PM

Just great , some municipalities , illegal to carry a knife with a certain length blade and a double edge but legal to carry a loaded gun .

 

...and now you understand the importance of preemption.



#13 oohrah

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 02:32 PM

Something is not illegal unless it specifically prohibited by a law.  I'm not aware of a state law that expressly forbids carrying a knife that has both sides of the blade sharpened, I'd say that they're not made illegal by any state law that I know of.

Texas prohibits the carry of double-edged knives, but it is legal to own on private property. There is a school of thought that interprets the Penal Code to say that if you are legally carrying a handgun with an LTC, that you can carry an otherwise illegal knife.  I do not intend to personally test those waters.


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#14 Ranger

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 08:03 PM

Thanks everyone!

#15 Dwe

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 09:44 AM

Is there language prohibiting the carrying of fixed blade knives concealed or openly?



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#16 kemikos

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 09:34 PM

Is there language prohibiting the carrying of fixed blade knives concealed or openly?


Not under state law, assuming you don't intend to use it "unlawfully against another". Your municipal ordinances may vary.

Edited by kemikos, 06 December 2017 - 09:35 PM.





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